Wednesday, June 28, 2006

Not. Quite. There.

But very close, as you can see. Again (mostly because socks aren't all that exciting on their own), we have the handsome Kramer, showing you a very nearly done sock. After I got home yesterday afternoon, I took some time to ice my neck and shoulders and knit in front of the TV. I'm ashamed to say, I stayed there throughout the evening, completely caught up in the History Channel (more on that later). The up side is that sock number 2 is only a few rows short of being done. This is the quickest I've knit a pair of socks in a long while, (and Margene?? I'm actually looking forward to the next pair!) Okay, the History Channel. First up, for my educational viewing pleasure was a story about the Aswan Dam, in Egypt....interesting but not enthralling. Next was "Decoding the Past" (love that) and more on The Holy Grail. Very interesting, but I'm growing rather weary of the whole grail thing. As I was watching yesterday, one thought I had was this: if there was a cup, do you really think someone thought to save it? And if there was a cup, and someone saved it, what do you suppose the chances are that it has a picture of Jesus on it, as some museum pieces do? Forgive me while I chase a rabbit here for a moment...... When we were in Italy last year, we visited a lot of churches. Hard to believe, but that is where some of the best art in the world can be viewed, and for free. Anyway, we had been in this fabulous church in Rome, the art and architecture were stunning, we overheard folks singing in a side chapel, it was all together a beautiful experience. Later in the day, I was reading in our guidebook that in that church, under the alter is a glass case containing bits of the manger. I have to tell you, my first thought was yeah, right. I mean really, when Jesus was born, in an out of the way stable, there were just a handful of folks who even knew what was going on. Which of them do you suppose decided to keep a feeding trough, in the hopes that it would one day be a conversation starter?? As a Christian, I thought it was a cool idea, but the logical side of me wasn't convinced. (Please understand, I am in no way mocking those who believe in the validity of such relics, to the faithful, they are evidence of their faith, and worthy of respect). Okay, back to the History Channel, and New Word Wednesday. Today's word is caldera which is a noun that means a volcanic crater that has a diameter many times that of the vent and is formed by the collapse of the central part of the volcano or by explosions of extraordinary violence. Last night on "Mega Disasters," geologists were talking about Yellowstone National Park, and how it exists today as a caldera. Now, I've been to Yellowstone numerous times, I've been to the visitors centers, watched the movies, stopped at the walking trails. Why didn't I know this?? Was I not paying attention? Did I not get the memo?? Seems that the whole northwest corner of Wyoming is just waiting to blow, devastating everything within 100 miles and changing the global climate for years. Scared yet? I thought, Oh well, it won't happen anytime soon, but then they started talking about GPS probe thingy's and satellite images that show the bulging of the land in and around the caldera, movement upwards to the tune of 6-8 centimeters per year, and I started to get a little nervous. Geologists say that an eruption at Yellowstone would be 100 times worse than Mt St Helens, and would ruin crops all across the midwest, killing livestock and people as the ash spread east. One guy said the entire Pacific Northwest would be "toast," (his words). Okay, enough of that, huh? On a positive note, the contest is drawing to a close. You still have a couple hours to get your answers to me by email. This afternoon I'm going to put the yarny prize in a box and send it off to one of you. I will send an email to the lucky winner, so watch your inbox! And now, I'm off to get some packing done and finish that sock!

4 Comments:

At 6/28/2006 11:08:00 AM, Blogger margene said...

Not sure where or when I heard that little factoid on Yellowstone but I have heard it and the thoughts of it sound awesomely cool to me...albeit a bit scary.

 
At 6/28/2006 11:08:00 AM, Blogger margene said...

Oh and Kramer...I love Kramer...he's just too handsome. Eat your heart out Moxie!

 
At 6/28/2006 03:53:00 PM, Blogger Chris said...

A word I actually remembered from geology in college - woo-hoo! Actually, geology is filled with numerous exciting/alarming factoids. For example, there's an inactive faultline in the middle of the US that, when it moves, is going to make the San Andreas look like a crack in the sidewalk. And those big rock columns at Devils Tower? Another one could fall at any time. Or not.

I highly recommend listening to (or reading if you're REALLY ambitious) Annals of the Former World by John McPhee - it won a well-deserved Pulitzer. He makes geology fascinating.

 
At 6/29/2006 06:00:00 AM, Blogger Cathy said...

When Yellowstone first came to the attention of Americans, the early geologists postulated that it was a volcanic region. They were pooh-poohed. I keep hearing about the Madrias fault and was thankful it didn't slip when I lived in the region. Earth is amazing.

 

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